Names of famous popes

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istockphoto 1323199659 170667a
istockphoto 1323199659 170667a

Few people know the names of popes word whizzle ever to exist, even if they are devoted Catholics. 

This is what can happen from imbibing from a culture short on history and research, as well as an education system which has forgotten how to teach basic stuff. 

This article will give you all the names of the popes in a chronological order.

There are over 260 popes in Catholic history, and they’ve had many different names. 

Here are some of the names discussed about famous popes:

1. “Pope” of Rome

People usually think that the title “Pope” is reserved only for the popes of the Catholic church. 

The word “pope” is derived from the Italian word “papa,” which means father. 

2. “Pope” of Germany/Holy Roman Empire

The title “Holy Roman Emperor” was not used for popes until the 16th century. 

Before then, “Holy Roman Emperor” refers to German kings who ruled Italian territory based on ancient Germanic law rather than on secular law. 

3. Pope” of Venice

Venice was ruled by the German kings until the 13th century. 

Since the Germans were Catholics, “Pope” refers to any bishop who is not under any king’s rule. 

Since Venice became an independent republic in the 13th century, its Catholic bishops were considered “popes” even though they did not represent any country or territory. 

4. “Pope” of the Church of England

People usually think that “Pope” is limited to the popes of the Catholic church. 

However, the title “Pope” also pertains to anyone who holds supreme authority over a religious institution. 

The head of the Church of England is called “the Archbishop of Canterbury,” not “the Pope.” 

The “Church” includes all Christian churches, whether or not they are Catholic or Protestant. 

But it does pertain only to the Anglican churches, which is why its bishops are sometimes called “popes” even though they do not have any territory under their rule. 

5. “Pope” of the Eastern Orthodox church

People usually think that “Pope” is limited to the popes of the Catholic church. 

However, the title “Pope” also pertains to anyone who has supreme authority over a religious institution. 

The head of the Eastern Orthodox church is called “the Patriarch of Constantinople,” not “the Pope.” 

So it makes sense that John Paul II (a former pope and Patriarch of Rome), who had authority over both Catholic and Eastern Orthodox churches, should be called a “Papa.” “Papa” means “father.”

The Patriarch of Constantinople is a Greek term, which means “Father of Constantinople.” 

The Patriarchate of Constantinople was originally the territory under the rule of the Byzantine Empire, which has since been divided into many countries. 

In modern times, it refers to the sovereign patriarchate that is under the Ecumenical Patriarch in Istanbul. 

Although it is not a part of any country or territory, its Patriarch still holds supreme authority over his country and all its churches. 

6. “Pope” of Mexico and Central America

Mexico and Central America belonged to Spain for hundreds of years. 

The current Pope is Spanish, and Spanish is still spoken in Mexico and Central America. 

So the term “Papa” still refers to the Catholic bishops in Mexico, Central America, the Philippines, etc. 

However, these bishops are no longer under any king’s rule or supreme authority. 

They have independent authority over their own churches. 

Therefore their title should not be confined to anyone who holds supreme religious authority over a country or territory. 

These bishops are mostly called “pope/patriarch” instead of “pope/archbishop.

7. “Pope” of the Philippines

The Philippines was once a territory under both Spain and the United States. 

When the Philippines became an independent country in 1946, it established its own Catholic Church hierarchy. 

So it’s Catholic bishops are called “pope/archbishop” instead of “pope/patriarch.” 

These bishops are not supreme religious authorities over any territory, either. 

They have only jurisdiction over the Catholic Church in the Philippines. It is not under any kings or supreme authorities, either. So this title “Pope/archbishop” fits quite well with their position. 

8. “Pope” of Japan

Japan is a country that has its own Catholic Church hierarchy. 

So the title “Pope” applies to the bishops in Japan even though they have no supreme authority over any territory. 

Since they have independent jurisdiction, their title is not restricted to anyone who rules a country or territory. 

9. “Pope” of Hawaii and Australia

Hawaii and Australia were territories under the U.S.A in the 20th century.

Since Hawaii and Australia have their own Catholic Church hierarchies, the title “Papa” is usually used for these bishops even though their churches have no supreme authority over any territory. 

The title “Papa” usually refers to the Catholic bishops in these countries, even though they do not hold supreme religious authority over them. 

10. “Pope” of Ireland (and soon of Great Britain)

The title “Pope” was not used for popes in Ireland until Pope John Paul II became one in 1979. 

The word “pope” is derived from the Latin word “papus,” which means bishop or teacher.

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